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  • Spread @2:35AM, 2016-05-08
    Tags: , sun   

    What Would It Take To Power U.S. With Solar Energy? 

     
  • Spread @2:36AM, 2016-04-22
    Tags: earth, , , space weather, sun   

    The #1 Risk to Earth 

    Ben Davidson explains how the sun can trigger the #1 risk to earth, based on severity and likelihood, and the current state of earth’s magnetic reversal, including how our protection from solar energy is weakening with it.

    In the second half of 2015 several minor solar upticks (100x weaker than ‘big’ ones) caused geomagnetic events we would expect from the only the largest flares every decade or so. This trend is expected to continue and it is not a pretty picture for the coming decades.

    Ben is the Director and Founder of Space Weather News, The Mobile Observatory Project, The Disaster Prediction App, SpaceWeatherNews.com, Suspicious0bservers.org, MagneticReversal.org, QuakeWatch.net, ObservatoryProject.com, and the Suspicious0bservers YouTube Channel, with more than 260,000 minds alert to what the mainstream deems ‘unimportant’.

    —Via Suspicious 0bservers

     
  • Spread @1:24AM, 2015-08-31
    Tags: , , , solar sunflower, sun   

    Solar Sunflower harnesses 5,000 suns 

    IMG_5485-front-view-1500px-980x653

    High on a hill was a lonely sunflower. Not a normal sunflower, mind you; that would hardly be very notable. This sunflower is a solar sunflower that combines both photovoltaic solar power and concentrated solar thermal power in one neat, aesthetic package that has a massive total efficiency of around 80 percent.

    The Solar Sunflower, a Swiss invention developed by Airlight Energy, Dsolar (a subsidiary of Airlight), and IBM Research in Zurich, uses something called HCPVT to generate electricity and hot water from solar power. HCPVT is a clumsy acronym that stands for “highly efficient concentrated photovoltaic/thermal.” In short, it has reflectors that concentrate the sun—”to about 5,000 suns.”

    Read the rest from Ars Technica

     
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