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  • Spread @2:26AM, 2017-05-01
    Tags: , history, Kiki de Montparnasse, mistresses   

    Kiki de Montparnasse 

    Alice Prin, known as the Queen of Montparnasse, was at the centre of Parisian bohemia in the 1920s. Raised in poverty, she moved to Paris when she was barely a teenager, took the nickname Kiki, and started posing nude for artists such as Alexander Calder, Jean Cocteau and Fernand Léger, while also selling her own paintings. Hemingway provided an introduction to her 1929 autobiography, Kiki’s Memoirs, and for a few years in the 1930s she owned a nightclub, “Chez Kiki”. For six years, she was Man Ray’s lover and muse, starring in several short films as well as hundreds of his photographs, including the iconic Le Violon D’Ingres. When he communicated his decision to leave her for his protegé, Lee Miller, she famously made a scene and threw plates at him in their local café.

    Read the rest: Iconic Mistresses in Art History via AnOther

     
  • Spread @11:05PM, 2017-03-25
    Tags: exorcism, exorcist, history, Theophilus Riesinger,   

    The Most Horrific Exorcism in American History 

    [Via Cult of the Weird] I’ve lived in Wisconsin my entire life, researching its fascinating and unexpected ties to the weird, dark corners of history for as long as I can remember. Sometimes it seems this state exists in some kind of anomalous vortex of the bizarre, with a unique concentration of ghost stories, murderous cannibals, circus history, world-famous hoaxes, and incredibly eccentric (or just plain mad) individuals. We have Ed Gein, Goatman, the Beast of Bray Road, pancake-serving aliens, and…famous exorcists.

    Last fall I discovered Father Walter Halloran, who assisted in the exorcism of Roland Doe in 1949, was buried in Milwaukee. Having weird history like that so close to home is exciting, but it turns out that Wisconsin was the stomping grounds of another even more legendary exorcist, one who participated in a case that shocked the world.

    In the first episode of a new podcast called Wisconsinology, historian Frank L. Anderson tells the story of Theophilus Riesinger, a Capuchin friar from Appleton, Wisconsin who became America’s foremost exorcist. Riesinger performed at least 22 exorcisms in his lifetime, but it was the harrowing case of demonic possession in 1928 that became the most publicized case of exorcism in American history.

    Read the rest

     
  • Spread @2:38AM, 2017-02-15
    Tags: , history, , red   

    A Brief History of Red 

    Recipe books from the Middle Ages reveal the extreme methods artists pursued to achieve their reds. For the most part, painters have always loved red, from the Paleolithic period to the most contemporary. Very early on, red’s palette came to offer a variety of shades and to favor more diverse and subtle chromatic play than any other color. In red, artists found a means to construct pictorial space, distinguish areas and planes, create accents, produce effects of rhythm and movement, and highlight one figure or another.

    Read it from The Paris Review

     
  • Spread @11:11PM, 2015-11-03
    Tags: , history   

    Shades of history, from black to white 

    Source: Lapham’s Quarterly

     
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