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  • Titus Toledo @2:38AM, 2017-05-21
    Tags: a day in the life, , culture,   

    How the Beatles Wrote ‘A Day in the Life’ 

    [Via The Atlantic] “The song has so much happening that when I casually listen I feel the accumulated effect, but attempting to really figure out what’s going on, I fear may take the fun out of it. Liking songs is risky. They are aural fireflies, and you can get too close and lose them. If ‘A Day in the Life’ is about anything, it speaks to the way the daily unfolding of worldly events touches the private fragilities of ordinary people. It’s Ulysses in a pop song, the typical day made unforgettable.”

    Read the rest: The Atlantic

     
  • Spread @3:06AM, 2017-04-30
    Tags: , culture, rituals, wiccan, witches night   

    How to Celebrate Witches Night April 30 

    Witches’ Night — also known as Walpurgisnacht or Hexennacht — happens annually on April 30th, and has been celebrated throughout Europe since at least the 17th century. Likely an evolution of Saint Walpurga’s Feast, it marks the halfway point between Halloween festivities (or as practicing Pagans call it, Samhain).

    Over time, it has morphed from an occasion to protect oneself from witches into a holiday that now revels in the iconography of the witch.

    And lucky us: this year it falls on a weekend.

    Read the rest: Medium

     
  • Spread @2:20AM, 2015-09-06
    Tags: culture, ,   

    The mysterious origins of punctuation 

    index

    As readers and writers, we’re intimately familiar with the dots, strokes and dashes that punctuate the written word. The comma, colon, semicolon and their siblings are integral parts of writing, pointing out grammatical structures and helping us transform letters into spoken words or mental images. We would be lost without them (or, at the very least, extremely confused), and yet the earliest readers and writers managed without it for thousands of years. What changed their minds?

    Read the rest from BBC

     
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