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  • Spread @10:47PM, 2017-03-25 Share | Link |
    Tags: , witchcraft   

    Inside the Salem Witch Trials 

    [Via The New Yorker] In 1692, the Massachusetts Bay Colony executed fourteen women, five men, and two dogs for witchcraft. The sorcery materialized in January. The first hanging took place in June, the last in September; a stark, stunned silence followed. Although we will never know the exact number of those formally charged with having “wickedly, maliciously, and feloniously” engaged in sorcery, somewhere between a hundred and forty-four and a hundred and eighty-five witches and wizards were named in twenty-five villages and towns. The youngest was five; the eldest nearly eighty. Husbands implicated wives; nephews their aunts; daughters their mothers; siblings each other. One minister discovered that he was related to no fewer than twenty witches.

    Read the rest

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  • Spread @10:41PM, 2017-03-25 Share | Link |
    Tags: edibles, , mushrooms   

    3 edible mushrooms you can find in forest near you 

    Learn how to find and forage delicious edible mushrooms in your backyard or in a nearby forest. This video will show you the most common dangerous mushrooms to avoid, as well as common edible mushrooms that are easy to identify, such as boletes, chanterelles, and cauliflower mushrooms. Let foraging expert Feral Kevin be your guide.

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  • Spread @3:58AM, 2017-03-25 Share | Link |
    Tags: , school of visual arts, underground posters, visual arts   

    Underground posters from the School of Visual Arts 

    Let’s be real about advertising for a moment. In the digital age, we’re constantly bombarded with click-bait ads and promotional videos. Audiences are becoming more sensitive to these efforts, ad blockers are on the rise, and in 2017 we can expect advertising to continue its trend toward the hyper-personalized. People want human-centric design. But for the School of Visual Arts in New York City, that has never been an issue.

    Read the rest from PRINT Magazine

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  • Spread @3:48AM, 2017-03-25 Share | Link |
    Tags: , , online course,   

    Free Online Course on Permaculture Design 

    Oregon State University is providing free access to the knowledge and tools needed to help combat climate change and other world issues in a massive open online course, or MOOC, on sustainable landscape design this spring.

    The four-week course, Intro to Permaculture, is a public education project that will enable students worldwide to learn about and design sustainable landscapes and ecosystems in a highly interactive way.

    The class runs May 1-27, 2017, and is open to all for free.

    The practical use of permaculture design techniques makes the course information easily applicable to a person’s life, said instructor Andrew Millison.

    “I’ve seen exponential growth in permaculture in recent years because it directly addresses many of the issues that are on people’s minds, such as climate change, food security and the alleviation of poverty,” he said. “Permaculture offers solutions to these issues, and this course gives people a way to make a positive impact.”

    Using interactive web apps, satellite imagery from Google Maps and Millison’s digital animation drawings as a guide, students will create their own landscape design site online through a series of detailed mapping exercises. By the end of the four weeks, students will be able to articulate major design strategies for each climate.

    In essence, the course aims to help people see the world like never before.

    “Permaculture gives people a new lens with which to see the landscape,” said Millison, who has 20 years of experience in the field. “The high-production visual element we’ll use in this class will really bring the activities to life in a way I’ve never seen before.”

    The development of the MOOC is a joint effort of Open Oregon State, OSU Professional and Continuing Education, Oregon State Ecampus and OSU Extension and Experiment Station Communications.

    “OSU’s strategic plan calls on us to be responsible stewards of environmental and social systems, locally and globally,” said Open Oregon State Director Dianna Fisher. “By working with the other units to develop and offer this course for free online, we can help learners everywhere do their part to address key world issues.”

    This is Oregon State’s third offering of the permaculture MOOC. The course was initially offered in May 2016, and more than 16,000 worldwide participants enrolled from nations such as Australia, Argentina, Poland, Botswana, Germany, India and South Africa.

    Register now.

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  • Spread @3:22AM, 2017-03-25 Share | Link |
    Tags: , lines, , sze tsung leong   

    Sze Tsung Leong 

    Poetic Pictures of Horizon Lines by Sze Tsung Leong

    See the rest from Fubiz

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  • Spread @3:03AM, 2017-03-25 Share | Link |
    Tags: casebooks, hospitals, Lindsey Fitzharris, , the butchering art   

    Houses of Death 

    Today, we think of the hospital as an exemplar of sanitation. However, during the first half of the nineteenth century, hospitals were anything but hygienic. They were breeding grounds for infection and provided only the most primitive facilities for the sick and dying, many of whom were housed on wards with little ventilation or access to clean water. As a result of this squalor, hospitals became known as “Houses of Death.”

    Read the rest from The Chirurgeon’s Apprentice

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  • Spread @2:56AM, 2017-03-25 Share | Link |
    Tags: information,   

    Why Information Matters 

    When we use a computer, its performance seems to degrade progressively. This is not a mere impression. Over the years of owning a particular machine, it will get sluggish. Sometimes this slowdown is caused by hardware faults, but more often the culprit is software: programs get more complicated, as more features are added and as old bugs are patched (or not), and greater demands are placed on resources by new programs running in the background. After a while, even rebooting the computer does not restore performance, and the only solution is to upgrade to a new machine.

    Philosophy can be a bit like a computer getting creakier. It starts well, dealing with significant and serious issues that matter to anyone. Yet, in time, it can get bloated and bogged down and slow. Philosophy begins to care less about philosophical questions than about philosophers’ questions, which then consume increasing amounts of intellectual attention. The problem with philosophers’ questions is not that they are impenetrable to outsiders — although they often are, like any internal game — but that whatever the answers turn out to be, assuming there are any, they do not matter, because nobody besides philosophers could care about the questions in the first place.

    Read the rest from The New Atlantis

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  • Spread @6:52AM, 2017-03-24 Share | Link |
    Tags: , , ,   

    Bob Dylan’s “Triplicate” 

    “I Could Have Told You” off Bob Dylan’s upcoming album “Triplicate.” Bob Dylan’s first three-disc album features 30 brand new recordings of classic American songs.

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  • Spread @6:27AM, 2017-03-24 Share | Link |
    Tags: hands, , mudras, yogi   

    Healing hands 

    You can create different posture from your hands. They are called ‘mudras’. It is said that mudras can influence the physical, emotional and spiritual energies of your body. It’s a very common practice in the east, and they are used by spiritual leaders in both Hinduism and Buddhism. In the modern era, yogis and other meditation practitioners use mudras.

    Here for some of the most common mudras: Detechter

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  • Spread @6:16AM, 2017-03-24 Share | Link |
    Tags: , , walt whitman   

    The Claustrophobic Paranoia of Walt Whitman’s Lost Novel 

    Via The New Yorker – Late one night last May, Zachary Turpin, a graduate student in the English department at the University of Houston, sat in bed next to his sleeping wife and daughter, hunting for lost works by Walt Whitman on his laptop. Turpin has spent untold hours poring over journals, letters, and other ephemera in the Walt Whitman Archive, noticing the poet’s distinctive phrases and cadences; that night, he was searching through old newspapers, hoping to find echoes of that prose. In an 1852 issue of the New York Daily Times (the newspaper dropped the word “daily” in 1857), he found a small advertisement for a novel that was to be serialized, anonymously, in another publication, the Sunday Dispatch. The novel was called “The Life and Adventures of Jack Engle.” Whitman had used the name Jack Engle in his journals. The ad’s grandiose copy also felt Whitmanian: it promised “an Auto-Biography, in which will be handled the Philosophy, Philanthropy, Pauperism, Law, Crime, Love, Matrimony, Morals, &c., which are characteristic of this great City at the present time.” Turpin wrote to the Library of Congress to request a scan of the newspaper in which the novel first appeared. “As it turns out, Jack Engle is the real thing,” he writes, in the introduction to the novel, which has just been republished by the University of Iowa Press. Whitman wrote the book while he was working as a contractor—he built houses—and writing “Leaves of Grass,” which he published in 1855. Only a single original copy has survived, in the six consecutive numbers of the Sunday Dispatch housed in the Library of Congress.

    Read the rest from The New Yorker

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  • Spread @11:51PM, 2017-02-25 Share | Link |
    Tags: , sleepwalker, Sonámbulo, ,   

    Sonámbulo 

    A surrealist journey through colours and shapes inspired by the poem Romance Sonámbulo by Federico García Lorca. Visual poetry in the rhythm of fantastic dreams and passionate nights. A film by Theodore Ushev. Music by Kottarashky

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  • Spread @11:01PM, 2017-02-25 Share | Link |
    Tags: , Gemma O’Brien,   

    Gemma O’Brien 

    Technological innovations will continue to wow and delight, but they’ll also come and go. In the creative world there is no replacement for the human touch as Australian calligrapher Gemma O’Brien shows us. O’Brien likens creating live art to sport. “You can’t just look away,” she says. While an artist like an athlete, can practice a concept to perfect it, the actual performance forces an artist to take a leap into an environment where mistakes can’t be airbrushed out. Here, O’Brien discusses why authenticity trumps perfection

    Read the rest at 99U

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  • Spread @3:10AM, 2017-02-24 Share | Link |
    Tags: , ,   

    My Obsession with a Beatles Song 

    Alec Wilkinson writing for The New Yorker: “She Said She Said” described a mystery I could see on the horizon, vibrating like a mirage. I am the youngest by some degree of four brothers, so I was conditioned to believe and to feel that the secrets of existence were in the possession of people a few years older than I was, who were closer to the ages of the Beatles.

    Read the full article: The New Yorker

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  • Spread @2:38AM, 2017-02-15 Share | Link |
    Tags: , , , red   

    A Brief History of Red 

    Recipe books from the Middle Ages reveal the extreme methods artists pursued to achieve their reds. For the most part, painters have always loved red, from the Paleolithic period to the most contemporary. Very early on, red’s palette came to offer a variety of shades and to favor more diverse and subtle chromatic play than any other color. In red, artists found a means to construct pictorial space, distinguish areas and planes, create accents, produce effects of rhythm and movement, and highlight one figure or another.

    Read it from The Paris Review

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  • Spread @12:50AM, 2017-02-13 Share | Link |
    Tags: , , paul nash   

    Paul Nash 

    Within moments of entering the Tate’s exhibit Paul Nash’s paintings, my brisk walk slowed to a mesmerized linger as I encountered something new and strange, watching the artist make discoveries and adjustments, trying in different ways to fit his vision to dark experience and to blend his “Englishness” with international modernism—and not always succeeding. Even at its most urgent, Nash’s painting seems tremulous, poised between past and future, dream and reality.

    Read the rest from The New York Review of Books

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  • Spread @11:39PM, 2017-02-12 Share | Link |
    Tags: , , love, short story   

    Love Is Blind and Deaf 

    They ate apples when they ate and, after a while, they knew it all. Eve grasped the purpose of suffering (there is none), and Adam got his head around free will (a question of terminology). They understood why the new plants were green, and where breezes begin, and what happens when an irresistible force meets an immovable object. Adam saw spots; Eve heard pulses. He saw shapes; she heard tones. And, at a certain point, with no awareness of the incremental process that had led them there, they were fully cured of their blindness and deafness. Cured, too, of their marital felicity.

    Fiction reads from The New Yorker

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