spread - new underground art + literature
Subscribe + Spread the Love | Log in
to toppermost of the poppermost, johnny!

Now Spreading... Toggle Comment Threads | Keyboard Shortcuts

  • Spread @3:10AM, 2017-04-26 Share | Link |
    Tags: , , ron athey   

    Ron Athey 

    “What is this desire for faith? When my whole world was consumed by AIDS, when people around me started dying, when every one of my heroes was gone, it felt like the book of apocalypse was happening. So that period influenced and scarred me in such a way that I lost faith. I had what you call a God hole.” —Ron Athey, performance artist

    Read the rest: BOMB Magazine

    email, print, bookmark, and share
     
  • Spread @2:57AM, 2017-04-26 Share | Link |
    Tags:   

    Capitalizing on an Old Tradition 

    When I first started as a self-taught newspaper/magazine designer all those many years ago, my inspiration came from illuminated manuscripts. This lead me, naturally, to initial capital letters used in 19th-century book and periodical design. I went crazy making letters that somehow illustrated the text but also stood on their own as letters or typography.

    Read the rest: Print Magazine

    email, print, bookmark, and share
     
  • Spread @1:57AM, 2017-04-26 Share | Link |
    Tags: , , surrealism   

    Salvador Dali’s 1973 Playboy photoshoot 

    For his photo shoot for Playboy magazine, Salvador Dali, long-time Playboy photographer Pompeo Posar, a gaggle of Playboy Bunnies and a giant egg headed to Cadaqués, a seaside town in Spain near where Dali lived in Port Lligat, a small village on a bay next to the town. The event would turn the sleepy village upside down during the shoot and local Dali-devotees would wait outside his home so that they could pay homage to the Surrealist by chanting “Master! Master!” whenever he left the residence to go to work under the blistering hot Spanish sun.

    Read the rest: Dangerous Minds

    email, print, bookmark, and share
     
  • Spread @11:27PM, 2017-03-25 Share | Link |
    Tags: , cinema, david lynch, ,   

    David Lynch on Memory, Chance and Intuition 

    “I saw a picture of the volcano Mt. St. Helens exploding and when you look at the smoke, it’s thick and it flows and roils a certain way. This is exactly the way the Elephant Man’s flesh looked. It was like a slow-motion explosion of flesh. Here’s the thing: just like in a painting, there are fast areas, and slow areas. These relationships are kind of critical, and how a thing flows is critical, but again, it’s not an intellectual thing. It’s an intuitive thing. You can’t really talk about it, but things have a way of wanting to be.” —David Lynch

    Read the rest of the interview with David Lynch, America’s foremost auteur about the principles powering his unique vision, here

    email, print, bookmark, and share
     
  • Spread @11:16PM, 2017-03-25 Share | Link |
    Tags: , , grant snider,   

    Styles of Writing 


    Credit: Grant Snider

    email, print, bookmark, and share
     
  • Spread @11:05PM, 2017-03-25 Share | Link |
    Tags: exorcism, exorcist, , Theophilus Riesinger,   

    The Most Horrific Exorcism in American History 

    [Via Cult of the Weird] I’ve lived in Wisconsin my entire life, researching its fascinating and unexpected ties to the weird, dark corners of history for as long as I can remember. Sometimes it seems this state exists in some kind of anomalous vortex of the bizarre, with a unique concentration of ghost stories, murderous cannibals, circus history, world-famous hoaxes, and incredibly eccentric (or just plain mad) individuals. We have Ed Gein, Goatman, the Beast of Bray Road, pancake-serving aliens, and…famous exorcists.

    Last fall I discovered Father Walter Halloran, who assisted in the exorcism of Roland Doe in 1949, was buried in Milwaukee. Having weird history like that so close to home is exciting, but it turns out that Wisconsin was the stomping grounds of another even more legendary exorcist, one who participated in a case that shocked the world.

    In the first episode of a new podcast called Wisconsinology, historian Frank L. Anderson tells the story of Theophilus Riesinger, a Capuchin friar from Appleton, Wisconsin who became America’s foremost exorcist. Riesinger performed at least 22 exorcisms in his lifetime, but it was the harrowing case of demonic possession in 1928 that became the most publicized case of exorcism in American history.

    Read the rest

    email, print, bookmark, and share
     
  • Spread @11:00PM, 2017-03-25 Share | Link |
    Tags: atlas myth, bodybuilding,   

    The Literature of Bodybuilding 

    [Via The Paris Review] The Atlas myth is a critical part of bodybuilding lore, an eternally recurring ur-story. From the famed Greek wrestler Milo of Croton, who allegedly invented resistance training by toting a calf on his back and increasing the load as it gained weight, down to the tales of men like Lou Ferrigno, who fashioned weights out of milk jugs and sand, bodybuilding stories are, at base, creation myths. Something muscular is forged from frail nothingness, and the creator lives happily ever after. (Milo, the story goes, was eaten by wolves or lions after getting stuck in the tree he was attempting to split with his bare hands, but at least he perished doing what he loved.)

    Read the rest

    email, print, bookmark, and share
     
  • Spread @10:52PM, 2017-03-25 Share | Link |
    Tags: album covers, bands, , pentagram, pink floyd   

    Pentagram’s identity for Pink Floyd Records 

    [Via Creative Review] Aubrey Powell and Storm Thorgerson’s record sleeves for Pink Floyd are some of the most memorable of all time. Working under the name Hipgnosis, the pair’s surreal imagery inspired generations of designers and have become enduring symbols of the band’s music. Think of Pink Floyd, and it’s near impossible not to imagine the prism on the cover of Dark Side of the Moon or the bright pink pig on the sleeve of Animals.

    Pink Floyd’s music and visual output is the subject of a major retrospective opening at London’s V&A Museum in May. In November last year, the band released a 27-disc box set of early singles and recordings on their record label Pink Floyd Records.

    Read the rest

    email, print, bookmark, and share
     
  • Spread @10:47PM, 2017-03-25 Share | Link |
    Tags: , witchcraft   

    Inside the Salem Witch Trials 

    [Via The New Yorker] In 1692, the Massachusetts Bay Colony executed fourteen women, five men, and two dogs for witchcraft. The sorcery materialized in January. The first hanging took place in June, the last in September; a stark, stunned silence followed. Although we will never know the exact number of those formally charged with having “wickedly, maliciously, and feloniously” engaged in sorcery, somewhere between a hundred and forty-four and a hundred and eighty-five witches and wizards were named in twenty-five villages and towns. The youngest was five; the eldest nearly eighty. Husbands implicated wives; nephews their aunts; daughters their mothers; siblings each other. One minister discovered that he was related to no fewer than twenty witches.

    Read the rest

    email, print, bookmark, and share
     
  • Spread @10:41PM, 2017-03-25 Share | Link |
    Tags: edibles, , mushrooms   

    3 edible mushrooms you can find in forest near you 

    Learn how to find and forage delicious edible mushrooms in your backyard or in a nearby forest. This video will show you the most common dangerous mushrooms to avoid, as well as common edible mushrooms that are easy to identify, such as boletes, chanterelles, and cauliflower mushrooms. Let foraging expert Feral Kevin be your guide.

    email, print, bookmark, and share
     
  • Spread @3:58AM, 2017-03-25 Share | Link |
    Tags: , school of visual arts, underground posters, visual arts   

    Underground posters from the School of Visual Arts 

    Let’s be real about advertising for a moment. In the digital age, we’re constantly bombarded with click-bait ads and promotional videos. Audiences are becoming more sensitive to these efforts, ad blockers are on the rise, and in 2017 we can expect advertising to continue its trend toward the hyper-personalized. People want human-centric design. But for the School of Visual Arts in New York City, that has never been an issue.

    Read the rest from PRINT Magazine

    email, print, bookmark, and share
     
  • Spread @3:48AM, 2017-03-25 Share | Link |
    Tags: , , online course,   

    Free Online Course on Permaculture Design 

    Oregon State University is providing free access to the knowledge and tools needed to help combat climate change and other world issues in a massive open online course, or MOOC, on sustainable landscape design this spring.

    The four-week course, Intro to Permaculture, is a public education project that will enable students worldwide to learn about and design sustainable landscapes and ecosystems in a highly interactive way.

    The class runs May 1-27, 2017, and is open to all for free.

    The practical use of permaculture design techniques makes the course information easily applicable to a person’s life, said instructor Andrew Millison.

    “I’ve seen exponential growth in permaculture in recent years because it directly addresses many of the issues that are on people’s minds, such as climate change, food security and the alleviation of poverty,” he said. “Permaculture offers solutions to these issues, and this course gives people a way to make a positive impact.”

    Using interactive web apps, satellite imagery from Google Maps and Millison’s digital animation drawings as a guide, students will create their own landscape design site online through a series of detailed mapping exercises. By the end of the four weeks, students will be able to articulate major design strategies for each climate.

    In essence, the course aims to help people see the world like never before.

    “Permaculture gives people a new lens with which to see the landscape,” said Millison, who has 20 years of experience in the field. “The high-production visual element we’ll use in this class will really bring the activities to life in a way I’ve never seen before.”

    The development of the MOOC is a joint effort of Open Oregon State, OSU Professional and Continuing Education, Oregon State Ecampus and OSU Extension and Experiment Station Communications.

    “OSU’s strategic plan calls on us to be responsible stewards of environmental and social systems, locally and globally,” said Open Oregon State Director Dianna Fisher. “By working with the other units to develop and offer this course for free online, we can help learners everywhere do their part to address key world issues.”

    This is Oregon State’s third offering of the permaculture MOOC. The course was initially offered in May 2016, and more than 16,000 worldwide participants enrolled from nations such as Australia, Argentina, Poland, Botswana, Germany, India and South Africa.

    Register now.

    email, print, bookmark, and share
     
  • Spread @3:22AM, 2017-03-25 Share | Link |
    Tags: , lines, , sze tsung leong   

    Sze Tsung Leong 

    Poetic Pictures of Horizon Lines by Sze Tsung Leong

    See the rest from Fubiz

    email, print, bookmark, and share
     
  • Spread @3:03AM, 2017-03-25 Share | Link |
    Tags: casebooks, hospitals, Lindsey Fitzharris, , the butchering art   

    Houses of Death 

    Today, we think of the hospital as an exemplar of sanitation. However, during the first half of the nineteenth century, hospitals were anything but hygienic. They were breeding grounds for infection and provided only the most primitive facilities for the sick and dying, many of whom were housed on wards with little ventilation or access to clean water. As a result of this squalor, hospitals became known as “Houses of Death.”

    Read the rest from The Chirurgeon’s Apprentice

    email, print, bookmark, and share
     
  • Spread @2:56AM, 2017-03-25 Share | Link |
    Tags: information,   

    Why Information Matters 

    When we use a computer, its performance seems to degrade progressively. This is not a mere impression. Over the years of owning a particular machine, it will get sluggish. Sometimes this slowdown is caused by hardware faults, but more often the culprit is software: programs get more complicated, as more features are added and as old bugs are patched (or not), and greater demands are placed on resources by new programs running in the background. After a while, even rebooting the computer does not restore performance, and the only solution is to upgrade to a new machine.

    Philosophy can be a bit like a computer getting creakier. It starts well, dealing with significant and serious issues that matter to anyone. Yet, in time, it can get bloated and bogged down and slow. Philosophy begins to care less about philosophical questions than about philosophers’ questions, which then consume increasing amounts of intellectual attention. The problem with philosophers’ questions is not that they are impenetrable to outsiders — although they often are, like any internal game — but that whatever the answers turn out to be, assuming there are any, they do not matter, because nobody besides philosophers could care about the questions in the first place.

    Read the rest from The New Atlantis

    email, print, bookmark, and share
     
  • Spread @6:52AM, 2017-03-24 Share | Link |
    Tags: , , ,   

    Bob Dylan’s “Triplicate” 

    “I Could Have Told You” off Bob Dylan’s upcoming album “Triplicate.” Bob Dylan’s first three-disc album features 30 brand new recordings of classic American songs.

    email, print, bookmark, and share
     
c
compose new post
j
next post/next comment
k
previous post/previous comment
r
reply
e
edit
o
show/hide comments
t
go to top
l
go to login
h
show/hide help
shift + esc
cancel